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Full text of "Pennsylvania Museum Bulletin. Number 59, October 1917"




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OCTOBER 1917 ♦ 



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Estned Aopist 27. 1903. at PhBadelphJa. P... as Seeond^tass Matter, under Act of Congress of July 16. 1894. 



PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 

AND SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART 



Boaii& of tTruetees 



The Governor of the State, Ex-Of. 



Mrs. RtcDGLPH Blankenburg 
Charles Bond 
James Butterworth 
John G. Carruth 
Mrs. Henry S. Grove 
John Gribbel 
Charles H. Harding 
Thomas Skelton Harrison 



John Story Jenks 
GusTAV Ketterer 
John H. McFadden 
■John D. McIlhenny 
Mrs. Arthur V. Meigs 
John W. Pepper 
Eli Kirk Price 



The Mayor of the City, Ex-Of. 



Walter H. Rossmassler 
Theodore C. Search 
Edgar V. Seeler 
Mrs. Joseph P. Sinnott 
Edward T. Stotesbury 
James F. Sullivan 
William Wood 



©fftcere 

THEODORE C. SEARCH, President 

JOHN STORY JENKS, 

JOHN G. CARRUTH, 

JAMES BUTTERWORTH, Treasurer 

LESLIE W. MILLER, Secretary, Principal of the School 

LANGDON WARNER, Director of the Museum 



Vice-Presidents 



SARA YQRKE STEVENSON, Sc.D., Editor 



Bulletin 

Ifor October, TUlneteen lKun&re^ anb Seventeen 
CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Announcement 33 

The Mrs. EUwood Davis Bequest of Old Laces 33 

Peasant Head-Dresses 38 

School Notes -.44 

Accessions 47 



BULLETIN 

OF 

THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 

OCTOBER, 1917 FIFTEENTH YEAR Number 59 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

It is with the most sincere pleasure that the Museum Committee of the 
Board of Trustees of the Pennsylvania Museum is able to announce the arrival 
of the new Director, Mr. Langdon Warner, who entered upon his functions on 
October first. Mr. Warner was highly recommended for the position by the 
former president of Har\^ard University, Charles W. Elioc, and by Dean Briggs 
of the same university. 

He recently has been connected with the Cleveland Museum, the Smith- 
sonian Institution and the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, for which institutions 
he conducted scientific researches in Asia, and was also appointed Director of 
the proposed School of Archaeology in Peking. While he has specialized in 
Oriental Art, he is a man of broad artistic sjTnpathies, whose energy and 
personality cannot fail to make a strong impression upon the work of the 
Pennsylvania Museum with distinct benefit to the communit3^ 

An opportunity will be given the friends of the Museum to meet Mr. and 
Mrs. Langdon Warner at a reception to be given in their honor at Memorial 
Hall on Wednesday, November 21st, from 4 to 6. 



THE MRS. ELLWOOD DAVIS BEQUEST OF OLD LACES 

Through the kind interest of Mrs. John Harrison a small but interesting 
collection of old laces, once the property of the late Mrs. EUwood Davis, has 
come into the possession of the Museum, and has been arranged in the Textile 
Room. Among the pieces are some of Italian cut work punto tagliato and 
embroidery, spaces filled with designs made of point lace stitches, going back, 
according to Mrs. Harrison, to the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. 

Of about the latter period are examples of Genoese and the later Milanese, 
probably of the seventeenth century (see ill. No. 1). A set of cuffs and medal- 



34 



BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



lions of flat point de Venise shown in illustration No. 2, may go back to 1750; 
and a piece of point d'Alengon dates from about the same period (ill. No. 3). 
For information on the value and history of these laces, consult previous 
Pennsylvania Museum Bulletins for January and April, 1905, October, 
1909, October, 1911. 

A veil of Flemish lace (ill. No. 4) is of somewhat later date, probably end 
of the eighteenth century. A fine specimen of Brussels pillow lace known as 
"Point dAngleterre" may go back to 1750 (ill. No. 5). 




1. Milanese. 
Seventeenth Century. 

There are in the collection some exquisite pieces of old Valenciennes of the 
finest texture (ill. No. 6,) 1775 and as early as 1700. The collection also includes 
some fine examples of Malines or Mechlin lace which carries us back to the 
eighteenth century — ^in all some thirty-five examples, which constitute an 
interesting addition to the already large collection owned by the Museum and 
now distributed between the Bloomfield Moore series and that displayed in the 
Textile Room. 

Could these two distinct series be brought together, the Pennsylvania 



BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



35 



Museum would be seen to ha\'e as fine a collection as any in the country. 
Unfortunately the testamentary dispositions made by the testatrix with regard 
to the invaluable collections bequeathed by her to the Pennsylvania Museiun 
are peremptory. Her laces as well as her ceramics, tapestries and furniture, etc., 
must be kept together and apart from the Museimi's collections, so that, 




Fl.'it Point de Venise. 
c. 1750. 



although the authorities of the Museum would probably be willing to transfer 
its admirable collection of old laces to Mrs. Bloomfield Moore's room in order 
to display all the laces under one classification, even this is impracticable, and 
the really fine collection in which the evolution of laces through an infinitude 
of varieties could be shown with decided educational advantage to the student, 



36 



BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 




3. Point d'Alenjon. 
Late Eighteenth Century. 




4. Mechlin Lace Veil. 
Late Eighteenth Century. 



BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



37 




5. Brussels Pillow Lace or Point d'Angleterre. 
c. 1750. 












6. Valenciennes. 
c. 1775. 




38 BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 

is divided, some links being formed in the Museum series and others in Mrs. 
Moore's display. When those in charge of the collections wish to demon- 
strate the connections between these exquisite specimens of art industry they 
must move their classes almost half a block across the building in order to 
establish their point. 

I have dwelt upon this, with a view to explaining a phenomenon which is 
apt to excite the wonder of the lace amateur, who is raade to tra-\-el from one 
point to another in search of comparative raaterial. Also because, by pointing 
out the result of a mistaken policy, one may hope that future would-be bene- 
factors of the Museum may be influenced to leave their miscellaneous collections 
to the Museum unhampered with conditions that limit their educational use- 
fulness and consequently to a certain extent their value. After all, the testator 
in leaving such valuable objects or series of objects to an institution obviously 
has at heart the promotion of its interests. All science is subject to develop- 
ment and to progress, perhaps of no science is this so true as of museum work; 
and for one generation of collectors to pass down to all generations to comx the 
standards of classification and installation of its own, is as illogical as it is 
hampering to those in charge who would like to handle it to the greater credit 
of all concerned. 

S. Y. S. 



PEASANT HEAD-DRESSES 

The collection of peasant head-dresses worn by the women of Holland, 
Bavaria, Tyrol, Alsace, Russia, and other localities, was made and presented to 
the Pennsylvania Museum by Mrs. William D. Frishmuth. 

To the series here illustrated belongs also a Venetiaji gentleman's cap 
(No. 1) of 3'ellow silk richly embroidered with flowers in thejr natural colors; 
also (No. 2) a Siberian Cossack woman's white fleece cap \«th round white 
cloth top trimmed with gold braid- 

One of the most interesting as well as attractive pieces in the collection is 
a Swiss cap from Appenzell (No. 3), the crown of which is of white satin covered 
with gold braid and imitation gems and large parallel butterfly wings of black 
net. Pink ribbon streamers complete the trimming. The whole forms a most 
graceful head covering. Another Swiss head-dress, a black silk cap edged with 
full wide lace, is from Montreux (No. 4). 

It is among the Russian women, however, that the more magnificent effects 
axe produced b}' the peasantry, especially that of the district of Nijni 
Novgorod, where those highly ornate diadem-like head-dresses la\'ishly 
embroidered in gold braid and jewels obtain. The dress of the Russian peasants 
varied greatly in dift'erent Russian governments. Nearly every district or 
village had its special dress ; most of these, ho\\'ever, seem to revert to medieval 
splendor. The women used a profusion of embroidery. The indoor dress was 
a skirt called "paneva," this was of thick woolen check material, and the 
"sarafan," a sort of skirt with or without bodice, pleated or gathered in front, 



BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA iMUSEUM 



5 ^ 




1. Venetian. 




2. Siberian Cossack. 



40 



BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



but always sleeveless, worn over a lingerie skirt much embroidered and of 
which the sleeves, when means allowed, were made of silk-brocade or velvet and 
even, at times, were covered with heavy gold embroidery. But it was the head- 
dress that occupied the most thought of the Russian women — the ' ' Kokosh- 
nicks," the "Kikas," the "Povowiks" — the crowns and diadems embroidered 
in gold with jewels and pearls, often displaying the greatest extravagance. 




4. MONTREUX. 



Switzerland. 



3. APPENZELL. 



It would seem that the headgear of the j^oung girls in form of crowm or 
diadem was contrived to show the hair, the pri\rilege of the young. Married 
women, however, were supposed to conceal their hair under their monumental 
head-dresses; not to do so betrayed lack of modesty. Native pearls were 
used in profusion on the head-dress as well as in necklaces of many rows. They 
were fresh-water pearls found in the great rivers and lakes of Northern Russia. 



BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



41 



These were at times worn with colored glass beads. Over the head-dress wide 
muslin or silk veils or "Fatas" were worn interwoven with silk or o-old floral 
designs, falling partly over the face. " 

The Russian head-dress, shown in illustration No. 5, is an ancient one from 
Nijni Novgorod. These are not unlike those worn in Moscow, although the 
latter are less angular, more graceful in shape and more becoming to the lines 




5. Nijni Novgorod. 6. Tul.\ District. 

Russia. 



7. Old Bozare Style. 
Northern Russia. 



of the face. From the Novgorod district also come more extravagant types in 
which, in addition to the close cap in which the head and face are framed, 
appear huge hats such as the " Incroyables " of the late eighteenth century 
wore under the French Directoire, only gaily embroidered and studded with gems. 
There is in the collection a toque-like head-dress of red velvet with a 
richly embroidered band, probably from the Tula district (No. 6); and the 



42 



BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



head-dress shown in "Peasant Art in Russia," in an article by Princess Alexandre 
Sidamon-Eristoff and Mile, de Chabels Koy (plates 41 and 43; Lane 1912), 
worn at Tver, is not unlike that from the Tyrol minus the lavish display of 
broad ribbons. 

Very different is the costume of Ukraine or Little Russia, which is very 
simple and like unto the get-up of peasants of other countries, rather than 
that of wives of medieval "boyards," from which doubtless those of Great 
Russia's peasantry' have been deri\'ed. 




Westphalia. 


8. Augsburg. 


10. Vienna, 


Germany. 


Germany. 

11. T\'ROL. 

Austria. 


Austria. 



From Northern Russia in the old Bozare style is a cap-shaped heaa cover- 
ing splendidly decorated with beads and colored glass; long purple strings 
edged with silver fringe depend from it (No. 7). 

Illustration No. 8 shows a black jet and gilt embroidery on black net, and 
black lace bow at the back, from Augsburg, Germany. No. 9 is an interesting 
cap from Borgholzhausen (Westphalia), braided and ornamented with colored 
bits of glass and edged with a broad white frill. 



BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



43 



Illustration No. 10, a raised gold design in crown, with wired lace, slightly 
full band, around the face, comes from the Vienna district, Austria: from the 
Austrian Tyrol we have Nos. 11 and 12, the first with silk crown adorned with 
gilt and gilt lace, worn by the peasants of the locality, the latter black and 




12. Tyrol. 
Austria. 



yellow with pearls, and long black ribbon streamers edged with gilt fringe. 
As a whole, the series is most interesting. It consists of fifty-eight well- 
selected specimens, the best each locality has produced, and added to the 
head-dresses owned bylthe Museum, forms a notable collection. 

S. Y. S. 



44 BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA AlUSEUM 

SCHOOL NOTES 

The sessions of the Art School opened September 24th. The enrollment 
is the largest ever made here for an entering class, and required the registration 
to be stopped the first week of the School until rearrangements could be made 
to admit more pupils. 

* * * 

The resignation of Mrs. Wildermuth seriously impairs the character of 
the nature work (animals) which she developed so extensively in the School, 
and to the maintenance of which she devoted so many years and so much 

energy. 

* * * 

Mr. Sinnock has resigned his work in connection with the day classes 
owing to the great inducements offered him by the Mint, where he will have 
opportunity for advancement, professionally and financially, not recognized as 
possible here. He will retain his position as instructor in the E\'ening Modeling 
Class for this season. 

Mr. Thayer has resigned his connection with the Evening Class in Costvune 
Design, having accepted a much better positioa offered him elsewhere. 

Mr. Andrade's resignation on account of ill health, and the necessity for 
removing to a western climate, necessitated the giving up of the special work 
in metal and enamal. The regular work required in the Constructive Design 
course will be carried on by Mr. Scott. 

Mr. Dunn's place as instructor in woodwork will be filled by Mr. Elmer 
S. Lukens; and the carving and furniture is in charge of Mr. Warwick. 

* * * 

New appointments made this season are: Miss Dorothy Finley, Assistant 
in Historic Ornament; Miss Elizabeth Norris, Assistant in Instrumental 
Drawing; Mr. Henry C. Potz, nature work (animals) and competitive problems 

in practical illustration. 

* * * 

Through the courtesy of the Director, Mr. Arthur Fairbanks, we were 
able to have photographs taken of the unusual and otherwise unobtainable 
examples of Egyptian and Greek work in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 
Mass., and in this way secured prints of Greek terra-cotta ornaments and 
decorative figures valuable for the students of modeling; and for the Costvune 
class certain parts of dress and accessories of the Egyptians, not elsewhere 
available. 

In July Miss Macfarlane conducted the design classes for the teachers of 
the Continuation Schools of the State. This work for the first time was under 
the auspices of the University of Pennsylvania. It was most successful. 



BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 45 

Traveling exhibits of the work of the Schools were sent by the Alumni 
Association to Columbia University (Teachers' College), University of Ten- 
nessee; the State Normal School, Johnson, Vermont; and the State Normal 
School at West Chester, Pa. Letters received, and newspaper clippings, 
clearly show the importance of sending these exhibits to Summer sessions with 
their large enroUments of Public School teachers. 

* * * 

The enrollment in the fourth Simimer session, held July 9th to August 3d, 
numbered 64. In these unsettled times this growth was very gratifying, as 
elsewhere many art classes had to be cancelled on account of small registration. 

* * * 

At the western end of the Costume Design Room, a small movable stage 
has been set up, on which costume and color effects and compositions of poses 
and groups can be readily tried. No place in the building has hitherto been 
available for this important experimenting, and the placing from time to time 
of the larger stage in the Auditorium was always attended with difficulties and 
expense of time too great to allow as a practice. The Interior Decoration class 
will work out problems in settings for scenes, which will be constructed as 
regular class work with Mr. Copeland and Mr. Adolph. It is of interest to 
mention that practically the only scene painters in Philadelphia were trained 
in this School, and we are fortunate in having one of them, Mr. Adolph, to 
carry on this practical development in the classes. 

* * * 

The State has guaranteed to all holders of its scholarships in this School 
who have gone into Government service, the renewal of their tenure. The 
City has extended them for one year, and it is hoped the various committees 
and individuals who have endowed others, will likewise give consideration to 
the reasons for absence in honorable response to the call of the country. The 
young men are in various camps in America and in France, in the Army, Navy, 
and Medical, and Reconstruction Units. The young women are taking the 
places of men draftsmen, at Baldwin's and other industrial plants, where they 
have been given the men's salaries and equal consideration, and are reported 
by the firms as equally capable. 

The young men have asked the renewal of their scholarships upon the 
condition of "a safe return from the war." 

* * * 

There were 67 foreign-bom pupils registered in the Art School last season, 
the largest number ever enrolled, and represented twenty-one different 
nationalities, as follows: 



Armenia 


France 


Ireland 


Russia 


Austria 


Germany 


Italy 


Scotland 


Brazil 


Greece 


Japan 


Sweden 


Canada 


Hungary 


Lithuania 


Switzerland 


Cuba 


India 


Roumania 


Turkey 


England 









46 BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 

This has a particular interest and significance in view of the Etiropean war 
conditions, which were the cause of many of the apphcants coming to this 
country, and also as future contributors to "Americanization" exhibitions of 
art work which may be held at the Museum. 

* * * 

The Fellowship established last season by the Associate Committee of 
Women, has not this year been awarded, as we have been able to secure 
partial employment for all the returning pupils who need assistance; but it is 
quite Hkely some of them will require this later, or another student return who 
will be in need of such help. 

* * * 

The School has received thje following gifts since the last report of the 
accessions was made: 

From Mrs. J. Cooke, Jr., through R'Ir. Ketterer, a large quantity of fine 
material for backgrounds and costume in connection with the School's work in 
pageantr^r. 

From Mrs. John Harrison, a collection of art pamphlets and magazines. 

From Mr. Abbot McClure, a set of sixteenth centui"}' wrought iron pot 
hooks for a chimney piece, and three modern EgT,'ptian linen applique hangings. 

From the Pennsylvania Hospital, through Dr. Kopp, a loan for an indefinite 
time of a very large collection of birds, animals, reptiles, and shells. 

From Miss Gertrude Abbott, two early nineteenth century iron candle- 
sticks. 

From Mrs. Helen Wilson Van Horn, one basket (1776), a parasol and fan 
(1840), a fan (1776) carried by an ancestress of Mrs. Van Horn at the ball 
given to Lafaj^ette at Independence Hall. Laces: two infant caps (1790), 
one cap with tabs and two collars (1848), two collars (Irish, 1876), two samples 
(Spanish), two samples (Honiton), three samples (Chantilly), three samples 
(Cluny). 



BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



47 



ACCESSIONS 
July— September, 1917 



CLASS 



Ceramics 

Glassware 

Metalwork 
Paintings 



Silversmith's 
Work 



OBJECT 



Textiles 



Miscellaneous 



HOW ACQUIRED 



Tea-set. consisting of 67 Pieces. Spode, 1808 | 

Fruit Dish with Open-work Design. Staffordshire WarC' 

29 Pieces of Pottery and Porcelain '. 

Drainer for Meat Platter, Staffordshire Ware ' 

2 Decanters, Oblong Dish and Bowl with Tray, 
Pressed Glass i 

Funnel, made by Henry William Stiegel. Manheim, I 
Pa.. 1765-1774 ' 



2 Coffee Urns and a Tea-pot. Copper. 
2 Brass Plaques 



15 Oil Paintings. Landscapes. Portraits, etc. 



I Silver Rimmed Spectacles, Octagonal Shape Lenses. 
I in Silver Case 



Complete Costume, including Dress. Petticoat, Hoop, 
Cape and Bonnet. American. 1856 

Sash, Bright Red Ribbon with Black Lace around 
Edge 

Printed Chintz Window and Bed Curtams 

Purple Velvet Tea Cosey 



Pair of Child's Cloggs. English, c. 1825 

Over Shoe, American, c. 1860 

2 Pictures made of Cork. "Lehigh River at Mauch 
Chunk" and "Residences of Asa Packer and Judge 
Leisenring" 



} Given by Mrs. Josephine Lippincott 
Stokes Adams. 
Lent by Prof. Lydia P. Borden. 
Given by Miss Mary H. Hart. 

Lent by Prof. Lydia P. Borden. 

Given by Mrs. Hampton L. Carson. 

Lent by Prof. Lydia P. Borden. 
Lent by Miss Mary H. Tobey. 

Lent by the Commissioners of Fair- 
mount Park. 



Given by Mr. Walter Leland in 
memory cf Mrs. Amos Leland. 



\ Given by Miss Mary H. Hart. 



Given by Mr. James Brodbent. 
Given by Mr. E. H. Harding. 



Given by Mrs. W. Beaumont Whitney. 



MEMBERSHIP 

The Trustees of the Pennsylvania Museum 
and School of Industrial Art desire the active 
co-operation of all public-spirited citizens 
who are known to be in sympathy with its 
educational work. All such persons are 
invited to become members. 

CLASSIFICATION OF MEMBERS 

Patron Members in Perpetuity — Those 
who contribute the sum of $5000 or more 
whether in money or objects for the Museum. 

Fellowship Members in Perpetuity — Those 
who contribute Si 000 at one time. 

Life Members — Those who contribute the 
sum of S 1 00 or more at one time. 

Annual Members — Those who contribute 
not less than 1 1 yearly. 

The contributions received from Patrons 
($5000), and from Life Members ($100), are 
added to the permanent Endowment Fund. 
Contributions from Annual Members ($10) 
are used to the best advantage in the develop- 
ment of the Museum and the School. 

ADVANTAGES OF MEMBERSHIP 

All members are entitled to the following 
benefits: 

The right to vote and transact business 
at the Annual Meeting. 

Invitations to all general receptions and 
exhibitions held at the Museum and the 
School. 

Free access to the Museum and School 
Libraries and admission to all lectures. 

Also a copy of each of the following pub- 
lications: 

The Annual Report of the Corporation. 

The Annual Circulars of the School of 
Applied Art and the Philadelphia Textile 
School. 

The Art Handbooks and Art Primers, 
issued from time to time by the Museum 
(a printed hst of publications will be mailed 
to any member on application). 

The Illustrated Quarterly Bcliftin of the 
Museum. 

A list of members is published each year 
in the Annual Report. 

Applications for membership, and remit- 
tances should be sent to the Secretary, 
P- M. & S. I. A., 320 South Broad Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

HOURS OF ADMISSION 

The Museum is open, free to the public, 
every day in the year. 
Opening Hours: 
Mondavs at 12 M. 
Other Week Days at 9.30 A. M. 
Sundays at 1 P. M. 
Closing Hours: 

During the summer months, 5 P. M. 

(Sundays, 6 P. M.) 
During the winter months, a half hour 
before sunset. 



CATALOGUES, HANDBOOKS, ETC. 
(On sale at the South Entrance) 

Handbook of the Museum $0.25 

A Brief History of the Bayeux Tapestry . 10 
Cork Models of Windsor Castle, Tower 
of London, Westminster Abbey, 

Church of St. Peter, Rome 10 

The Great Seals of England 25 

Handbook of the Collection of Tulip 
Ware of the Pennsylvania-German 
Potters: 

Paper cover 1 . 00 

Large paper edition. Cloth 5 . 00 

Handbook of the Maiolica of Mexico: 

Paper cover 1 . 00 

Flexible Art Canvas 2 . 00 

Art Primer No. 3, Lead Glazed Pottery .50 
Art Primer No. 5, Tin Enameled Pot- 
tery 50 

Art Primer No. 6, Salt Glazed Stone- 
ware 50 

Art Primer No. 9, Hard Paste Porce- 
lain 50 

Art Primer No. 11, Artificial Soft Paste 

Porcelain 50 

Bulletin of the Pennsylvania Museum 

(quarterly), per annum 1 . 00 

Catalogue of Tiles 25 

Catalogue of Fakes and Reproductions . 25 



Friends of the Institution who desire 
to devise to it money should use the fol- 
lowing: 

Form of Bequest 

I give and bequeath unto the Pennsyl- 
vania Museum and School of Industrial Art 

the sum of dollars 

for the use of the said Corporation. 

Witnesses 



Form of Devise of Real Estate 

I give and devise unto the Pennsylvania 
Museum and School of Industrial Art, its 
successors and assigns, all that certain (here 
insert a description of the property) for the 
use of the said Corporation. 



Witnesses.. 



PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 

AND SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART 

MUSEUM COMMITTEE 

John D. McIlhenny, Chairman Edgar V. Seeler 

Thomas Skelton Harrison Mrs. W. T. Carter 

John Story Jenks Mrs. W. D. Frishmuth 

GusTAV Ketterer Mrs. John Harrison 

John H. McFadden Mrs. Edward T. Stotesbury 
John W. Pepper 

Mrs. Rudolph Blankenburg, Ex-Officio 

Mrs. Cornelius Stevenson, Sc.D., Assistant Curator and Lecturer 

HONORARY CURATORS 

Textiles, Lace and Embroidery Mrs. John Harrison 

Oriental Pottery Mrs. Jones Wister 

European Porcelain Rev. Alfred Duane Pell 

Arms and Armor Cornelius Stevenson 

Furniture and Woodwork Gustav Ketterer 

Musical Instnunents Mrs. W. D. Frishmuth 

Numismatics F. D. Langenheim 

Sculpture, Marbles and Casts Alexander Stirling Calder 

INSTRUCTION COMMITTEE 

Theodore C. Search, Chairman Mrs. F. K. Hipple 

Charles Bond Miss Nina Lea 

Mrs. John Harrison Mrs. Arthur V. Meigs 

Thomas Skelton Harrison Mrs. Thomas Roberts 

John Story Jenks Mrs. Joseph P. Sinnott 

John D. McIlhenny Mrs. C. Shillard Smith 

Edgar V. Seeler Mrs. John Wister 

James F. Sullivan Mrs. Jones Wister 
William Wood 

Mrs. Rudolph Blankenburg, Ex-Officio. 

ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN TO THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
Pcesident 
Mrs. Rudolph Blankenburg 

Fint Vice-President Second Vice-President 

Miss Nina Lea Countess Santa Eulalia 

Secretary Treasurer 

Mrs. Henry S. Grove Mrs. Joseph P. Sinnott 

Mrs. Edwin Swift Balch Mrs. W. W. Gibbs Mrs. Thornton Oakley 

Mrs. Jasper Yeates Brinton Mrs. John Harrison Mrs. Percival Roberts, jr. 

Mrs. John H. Brinton Mrs. C. Leland Harrison Mrs. Thomas Roberts 

Mrs. William T. Carter Miss M. S. Hinchman Miss Ma^ E. Sinnoit 

Miss Margaret Clyde Mrs. F. K. Hipple Mrs. C. Shh-lard Smith 

Mrs. Henry Brinton Coxe Mrs. J. L. Ketterlinus Mrs. Cornelius Stevenson 

Miss Ada M. Crozer Mrs. Robert R. Logan Mrs. Edward T. Stotesbury 

Mrs. David E. Dallam Mrs. Howard Longstreth Mrs. William H. Walbaum 

Miss Cornelia L. Ewing Mrs. Arthur V. Meigs Mrs. A. B. Wemer 
Mrs. George Harrison Prazier Mrs. James Mifflin Mrs. John wister 

Mrs. W. D. Frishmuth Mrs. Francis F. Mh-ne Mrs. Jones Wister 

honorary member 
Mrs. M. Hampton Todd